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Canning

Canning, Pickles, Recipes

Maui Cowboy Candy

August 20, 2015

Maui Cowboy CandyA while back, our friend Kim shared the tail end of a jar of candied jalapeños (also known as Cowboy Candy) that someone had given to her.  Distinctly sweet, crisp, and hot at the same time, John told me that they were delicious (I was nervous about the partial bottle. John is more adventurous!).  John grows several varieties of jalapeños that produce large, hot, gorgeous, peppers, and we make nacho rings as well as a delicious hot sauce with these peppers.  Intrigued by a new way to use our peppers we began searching on-line for a recipe.  We found several, but this one stood out.

Jalapeños from the GardenWe wait until some of the jalapeños ripen to red before making our Maui Cowboy Candy.  The jars look beautiful and festive.

Maui Cowboy Candy

Filling Jars with Maui Cowboy CandyThey are delightful with Mexican cuisine, sandwiches, in cheesy corn bread, potato salad, on crackers with cream cheese, or straight out of the jar.  I added them to my tofu banh mi sandwich below.

Maui Cowboy Candy on Banh Mi

Maui Cowboy Candy
 
Adapted from Foodie with Family ~ Blog Makes 7 - 8 half pint jars
Author:
Recipe type: Pickles
Ingredients
  • 3½ - 4 pounds fresh jalapeños
  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 6 cups granulated sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon ground turmeric
  • ½ teaspoon celery seed
  • 1 teaspoon granulated garlic
Preparation
  1. Prepare jars and canner: Wash jars and place them in boiling water canner. Fill the jars and canner with water to the top of the jars. Cover and bring water to a simmer over medium heat, do not boil. Prepare the two-piece closures. Wash lids and place in a small saucepan and cover with water. Heat to just a simmer but do not boil. Do not heat screw bands.
  2. Wash jalapeños and slice into rings. Set aside.
  3. Combine cider vinegar, sugar, turmeric, celery seed, and granulated garlic in a large pot. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer for 5 minutes. Add pepper slices, raise heat to medium-high, cook for 5 minutes, stirring constantly.
  4. Remove jars and empty hot water back into the canner. Place jars on a cutting board. Using a canning funnel and slotted spoon, fill the jars with peppers one at at time to within ½ inch of the rim of the jar.
  5. After all peppers are removed and placed in jars, bring syrup to a full rolling boil. Boil hard for 5 minutes. Using a ladle, pour boiling syrup into the jars over the jalapeños within ¼ inch of the rim of the jar. Remove air pockets in jar with a chopstick. Wipe the rims of the jars with a clean, damp paper towel. Secure two-piece lids and rings.
  6. Return jars to canner and ensure that all jars are covered by at least 1 inch of water. Cover canner and bring water to a full boil over high heat. Process for 10 minutes, starting timer only when water reaches a full boil.
  7. Remove jars to cooling rack. Once thoroughly cooled, date jars and use within 1 year.

 

 

 

Canning, Fruit, Jams & Jellies, Recipes

Mango-Pineapple Jam

October 26, 2014

Mango-Pineapple JamThis past summer we once again had a good harvest of mangoes and were looking for a new jam recipe to try with our beautiful fruit. So after a bit of searching on-line, we tried Rachel’s recipe from her blog Coconut & Lime.  The combination of mango and pineapple is delicious.  Rachel mentions in her comment section that this particular jam is on the loose side.  The jam tasted fantastic, but I wished it were just a bit firmer.  The original recipe calls for liquid pectin.  The second time we made it, we tried using regular powdered pectin.  This still did not make for a firmer jam so we tried low-sugar pectin and adjusted the amount of fruit and sugar and it worked perfectly.

Maui Gold Pineapple Adding fresh pineapple gives this jam a lovely tropical flavor.  Being able to can the jam so that it is shelf stable for up to a year is the key to enjoying the flavors of summer even when summer is long gone.

Making Mango-Pineapple JamThe fruit, lemon juice, rum and pectin are cooked on the stove before adding the sugar.  Once the sugar is added you continue to cook the mixture until it is thick and jammy as in the photo below.  Scrumptious.

Mango-Pineapple Jam

 

mango pineapple jam - 1 (1)

 Mango Pineapple Jam

Adapted from Coconut & Lime Blog

Makes 6 half pint jars

Ingredients

3 cups diced mango

3 cups diced fresh pineapple

2 tablespoons dark rum (optional)

1/4 cup lemon juice

1 package (1 3/4 ounce) Sure-Jell low/no sugar pectin or 3 tablespoons Ball low/no sugar pectin

4 cups sugar (725 grams)

Preparation

Wash jars and place them in boiling-water canner.  Fill the jars and canner with water to the top of the jars.  Cover and bring water to a simmer over medium heat, do not boil.  Prepare the two piece closures.  Wash lids and place in a small saucepan and cover with water.  Heat to just a simmer but do not boil.  Do not heat screw bands.

While jars are simmering, pour fruit, dark rum, lemon juice and pectin in an 8 – 10 quart pot, preferably with high sides.  Place over high heat, stirring constantly with a long-handled wooden spoon.  Bring to a rolling boil that cannot be stirred down.  Still stirring, add sugar.  Return to a boil that cannot be stirred down, and boil for exactly 1 minute.  Remove from the heat.

Lift the canner jar rack and fix into place on the rim of the canner. Remove one jar at a time from canner and empty hot water back into the canner. Place jar on a cutting board and place a canning funnel in the jar.  Ladle hot jam into jar leaving 1/4 inch head space.  With a clean damp cloth or paper towel wipe jar rim to remove any food residue.  Using a magnetic utensil, lift hot lid from water, center it on the  jar and place screw band on jar.  Tighten screw band evenly and firmly just until resistance is met.  Then increase to finger tip tight.  Do not over tighten.  Return jar to canner rack.  Continue filling jars individually until all jars are filled, lower rack into canner and ensure that all jars are covered by 1 inch of water.  Cover canner and bring water to a full boil over high heat.  Process for 10 minutes, starting timer only when water reaches a full boil. Turn off heat, remove jars from canner after 5 minutes to cooling rack.  Leave them undisturbed for 24 hours.  After 24 hours check lids for proper seal.  Remove screw bands  and press down on the lid with your finger.  Sealed lids will curve in and will show no movement when pressed.  Jars that haven’t sealed properly must be refrigerated immediately or reprocessed.  Wipe jars and store in a cool, dry place.  Label and date jars.  Properly sealed jars will keep in your cupboard for up to one year.

 

 

 

Canning, Mexican, Pickles, Recipes, Veggies

Jalapeño Nacho Rings

June 7, 2014

Jalapeño Nacho RingsWe love jalapeños.  They seem to thrive in the Maui heat.  Apparently hot climates produce hot peppers!  The red peppers are the fully mature stage of the jalapeño and add beautiful color mixed with the younger green jalapeños.

Jalapeño Plants  We now have 10 jalapeño plants in the garden.  We make both pickled nacho rings and jalapeño hot sauce .

Jalapeño Nacho Rings

Pickled Jalapeños

Makes 4 pint jars

Ingredients

2 pounds fresh jalapeño peppers

2 1/2 cups white vinegar

2 1/2 cups water (distilled or filtered)

5 teaspoons pickling salt

1/4 teaspoon turmeric

1 1/4 teaspoons calcium chloride (Ball brand Pickle Crisp)

4  2-inch sprigs fresh Mexican oregano (optional)

Preparation

Wash jalapeños and slice into 1/4 to 1/3 inch rings. It’s a good idea to wear disposable gloves when cutting peppers. Divide sliced peppers into 4 equal portions.

Wash jars and place them in boiling-water canner.  Fill the jars and canner with water to the top of the jars.  Cover and bring water to a simmer over medium heat, do not boil.  Prepare the two-piece closures.  Wash lids and place in a small saucepan and cover with water.  Heat to just a simmer but do not boil.  Do not heat screw bands.

In a medium-sized saucepan add remaining ingredients except oregano sprigs.  Bring to a boil, then simmer for 5 minutes on low heat.

Lift the canner jar rack and fix into place on the rim of the canner. Remove one jar at a time and empty hot water back into the canner. Place jar on a cutting board. Place a canning funnel in the jar.  Add 1 oregano sprig to the jar, pack jar with portioned jalapeño rings. Ladle hot brine into jar leaving 1/2-inch head space.  Remove air bubbles (with a chopstick or similar utensil) and adjust head space, if necessary, by adding more brine.  Wipe jar rim. Using a magnetic utensil, lift hot lid from water, center it on the  jar and place screw band on jar.  Tighten screw band evenly and firmly just until resistance is met.  Then increase to fingertip tight.  Do not over tighten.  Return jar to canner rack.  Continue filling jars individually until all jars are filled, lower rack into canner and ensure that all jars are covered by 1 inch of water.  Cover canner and bring water to a full boil over high heat.  Process for 10 minutes, starting timer only when water reaches a full boil. Turn off the heat, let jars sit in pot for 5 minutes.

Remove jars from water, and let stand,  undisturbed, at room temperature 24 hours.  To check seals, remove the bands, and press down on the center of each lid.  If the lid doesn’t move, the jar is sealed.  If the lid depresses and pops up again, the jar is not sealed.  In the event that a jar does not seal, simply refrigerate it. Store properly sealed jars in a cool, dark place up to 1 year (date your jars on the bottom with a Sharpie pen)  Refrigerate after opening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canning, Lactose Free, Pickles, Recipes, Vegan, Vegetarian, Veggies

Homemade Dill Pickles

April 21, 2014

Keiki CukesPickles, pickles, pickles.  I can’t live without them.  Crunchy, tangy, salty, dilly, best chilled and served alongside a sandwich.

Homemade Dill Pickle

Keiki CukesJohn’s grandmother, Ida, made terrific dill pickles. Unfortunately, her recipe was lost. With the memory of those pickles in mind, he has been determined to make his own dills ever since. He used to grow cucumbers specifically for pickle making.  Unfortunately the garden pests were fond of them too.  Most destructive are the pickle worms that burrow into the poor little cukes.  It’s very frustrating to have spent so much time nurturing your plants only to have them destroyed.  Now that our local Costco sells these Keiki Cukes, we’re in business again.  These crunchy cucumbers are perfect for pickles.

Sliced CukesBeautiful mini cucumbers with tender skin and few seeds.

Divide Up Cucumbers for Each JarIt is best to have your mise en place ready.  Divide up the cucumbers for each jar so that you can work quickly to get the jars into the water bath canner.

Red Pepper Flakes

Pickling Spices, Mustard Seeds, Black Peppercorns, Dill Seeds, Red Pepper FlakesThe pickling spice is optional but it does add a nice flavor to the brine.  If you don’t have a tea ball you may use cheese cloth.

Tea Ball with Pickling Spices

Fresh Dill & Garlic

Spices in Jar

Dill Pickles

Homemade Dill Pickles

Makes 4 Quart Jars

Ingredients for pre-brine (optional)

3 quarts distilled or filtered water

5 tablespoons pickling salt

Ingredients for the brine

4 cups white vinegar

4 cups distilled or filtered water

2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons pickling salt

2 teaspoons calcium chloride, AKA “Pickle Crisp” (optional)

3 tablespoons mixed pickling spice (in a tea ball or cheese cloth)

 Ingredients for the jars

4 1/2 pounds Keiki Cukes or other pickling cucumbers (about 18 ounces per jar)

4 teaspoons yellow mustard seeds

4 teaspoons black peppercorns

4 teaspoons dill seeds

2 teaspoons red pepper flakes

4 garlic cloves, crushed

4 large sprigs of fresh dill

Preparation

Wash cucumbers. Trim ends for uniformity and slice in half lengthwise.  At this point, one option is to pre-brine the sliced cucumbers overnight in 3 quarts distilled or filtered water mixed with 5 tablespoons pickling salt.  This is recommended but not required.  It does make for a crisper pickle. To portion the cucumbers for each jar, use an empty quart mason jar and snuggly pack with the cucumber slices. Remove slices and place in individual bowls and set aside.

Wash jars and place them in boiling-water canner.  Fill the jars and canner with water to the top of the jars.  Cover and bring water to a simmer over medium heat, do not boil.  Prepare the two-piece closures.  Wash lids and place in a small saucepan and cover with water.  Heat to just a simmer but do not boil.  Do not heat screw bands.

Place brine ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to a boil, turn down the heat and simmer for 5 minutes.

Lift the canner jar rack and fix into place on the rim of the canner. Remove one jar at a time from canner and empty hot water back into the canner. Place jar on a cutting board.  Place 1 teaspoon each of yellow mustard seeds, black peppercorn, dill seeds, 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes as well as 1 crushed garlic clove and 1 large sprig of fresh dill.  Pack  cucumbers into jar to within a generous 1/2 inch of top of jar.  Place a canning funnel in the jar.  Ladle hot brine into jar leaving 1/2-inch head space.  Remove air bubbles (with a chopstick or similar utensil) and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding more brine.  Wipe jar rim. Using a magnetic utensil, lift hot lid from water, center it on the  jar and place screw band on jar.  Tighten screw band evenly and firmly just until resistance is met.  Then increase to fingertip tight.  Do not over tighten.  Return jar to canner rack.  Continue filling jars individually until all jars are filled, lower rack into canner and ensure that all jars are covered by 1 inch of water.  Cover canner and bring water to a full boil over high heat.  Process for 15 minutes, starting timer only when water reaches a full boil.

Remove jars from water, and let stand,  undisturbed, at room temperature 24 hours.  To check seals, remove the bands, and press down on the center of each lid.  If the lid doesn’t move, the jar is sealed.  If the lid depresses and pops up again, the jar is not sealed.  In the event that a jar does not seal, simply refrigerate it. Store properly sealed jars in a cool, dark place up to 1 year (date your jars on the bottom with a Sharpie pen)  Refrigerate after opening.

 

 

Canning, Recipes, Sandwiches, Vegan, Vegetarian

Whole Grain Mustard

March 8, 2014

Whole Grain Mustard with a Side of Snacks“Southern Living’s” Little Jars, Big Flavors (small batch jams, jellies, pickles, and preserves from the South’s most trusted kitchen) is a real gem.   We’ve made the mixed berry jam and have now ventured on to whole grain mustard.  Both of these recipes are superb.   Neither one is time-consuming nor do they require any hard to find ingredients.  Plain and simple, they are delicious.

Organic Mustard SeedsThanks go to our daughter Jessica (who brought this recipe to our attention) for sending a “care” package full of mustard seeds and powder as well as some difficult to find whole grain bread ingredients.

Brown Mustard SeedsBrown mustard seeds.

Yellow Mustard SeedsYellow mustard seeds.

Organic Ground Yellow Mustard

Mustard Seeds and VinegarThis photo shows the first step of making the whole grain mustard.  The seeds and vinegar are placed in a large jar and set aside for 5 days.  The mustard seeds are quite thirsty and soak up much of the vinegar, quickly.

Mustard Seeds & Vinegar 2 Hours LaterAs you see in this picture, it’s only been a couple of hours and much of the vinegar has been absorbed by the seeds.

Mustard Day 8Five days later, other ingredients are added to the mixture.  Set the jar aside for another 5 days.  So simple.

Mustard in BlenderThe mustard is placed in a blender and processed until the desired consistency is met.

Blended MustardWhole grain mustard ready for canning.  It smells so good.

Whole Grain MustardThis whole grain mustard is delicious slathered on good bread with thinly sliced pastrami, ham or in an avocado sandwich.  It makes a wonderful dressing for potato salad.

Potato Salad with Whole Grain Mustard

Whole Grain Mustards

Whole Grain Mustard

Adapted from Southern Living ~ Little Jars Big Flavors

Makes 4 half-pint jars

Ingredients

1 1/4 cups white wine vinegar (5% acidity), divided

1 1/4 cups red wine vinegar (5% acidity), divided

3/4 cup brown mustard seeds

3/4 cup yellow mustard seeds

1/4 cup dry white wine

2 tablespoons honey

3 tablespoons dry mustard

4 teaspoons salt

2 teaspoons freshly ground pepper

Preparation

Stir together 1 cup white wine vinegar, 1 cup red wine vinegar, and brown and yellow mustard seeds in a clean 1-quart jar.  Cover with lid, and let stand at room temperature 5 days, adding more red or white vinegar if seeds look dry.

Stir in remaining 1/4 cup white wine vinegar and 1/4 cup red wine vinegar, white wine, honey, salt and pepper.   Stir in dry mustard.  Cover with lid, let stand at room temperature 5 more days. (Mixture may be slightly bubbly, not a problem)

Process mustard mixture in a blender until desired consistency is reached.  The original recipe calls for using a food processor rather than a blender.  This produces a coarser textured mustard.  I prefer a bit creamier yet still rustic texture that is produced by using a blender.  If the mustard is too thick, its consistency can be adjusted by adding a little water or more vinegar.  The mustard should not be too thick otherwise you may end up with air bubbles in the mustard that will be difficult to remove.

Sterilize jars, and prepare lids for canning:

Wash jars and place them in boiling-water canner.  Fill the jars and canner with water to the top of the jars.  Cover and bring water to a simmer over medium heat, do not boil.  Prepare the two-piece closures.  Wash lids and place in a small saucepan and cover with water.  Heat to just a simmer but do not boil.  Do not heat screw bands.

Lift the canner jar rack and fix into place on the rim of the canner. Remove one jar at a time from canner and empty hot water back into the canner. Place jar on a cutting board and place a canning funnel in the jar.  Ladle mustard into jar leaving 1/2-inch head space.  If you notice any air pockets do your best to remove them with a chopstick or similar utensil. With a clean damp cloth or paper towel wipe jar rim to remove any food residue.  Using a magnetic utensil, lift hot lid from water, center it on the  jar and place screw band on jar.  Tighten screw band evenly and firmly just until resistance is met.  Then increase to fingertip tight.  Do not over tighten.  Return jar to canner rack.  Continue filling jars individually until all jars are filled, lower rack into canner and ensure that all jars are covered by 1 inch of water.  Cover canner and bring water to a full boil over high heat.  Process for 15 minutes, starting timer only when water reaches a full boil.  Any leftover mustard can be refrigerated for immediate use.

Remove jars from water, and let stand,  undisturbed, at room temperature 24 hours.  To check seals, remove the bands, and press down on the center of each lid.  If the lid doesn’t move, the jar is sealed.  If the lid depresses and pops up again, the jar is not sealed.  In the event that a jar does not seal, simply refrigerate it. Store properly sealed jars in a cool, dark place up to 1 year.  Refrigerate after opening.

 

 

Canning, Fruit, Jams & Jellies, Recipes

Mixed Berry Jam

February 12, 2014

Mixed Berry Jam on ToastMango season is over and, alas, we have no lilikoi either. We love making jams and jellies from our own fruit, but when these fruits are out of season we look to other sources.

Blackberries, Blueberries, RaspberriesA mixed berry jam came to mind when John received his copy of Little Jars, Big Flavors published by Southern Living.  The book was on the Serious Eats list of  best Christmas gift books for 2013.  The recipes consist of small-batch jams, jellies, pickles, and preserves.  We were making our weekly trip to Costco and discovered that their selection of blackberries, raspberries and blueberries were all in perfect condition.  Buying various types of berries can be tricky.  I’ve purchased a container of blackberries that looked fine, however the next morning when I opened the container, to my dismay they were moldy. Aargh!

Crush Mixed BerriesThough the recipes in the book are “small-batch” we doubled the recipe because  we had bought so many good-looking berries.  Why not?

Cooked BerriesThis was a very simple recipe that produced the most delicious berry jam.  No pectin required.  We expected to have 8 half-pint jars of jam but ended up with 9 jars.  Since we only prepared 8 jars for canning we refrigerated the 9th jar and it was gone in a week! Have you ever had peanut butter and jam on toast for dessert? Scrumdiddlyumptious.

Mixed Berry Jam and Toast

Mixed Berry Jam

Southern Living ~ Little Jars, Big Flavors

Makes 9 half pint jars

Ingredients:

24 ounces (5 cups) blackberries

12 ounces (3 cups) raspberries

24 ounces (4 cups) blueberries

38 ounces sugar (6 cups)

2 tablespoons lime juice

Preparation

Rinse berries thoroughly under cold running water.  Remove and discard stems and any blemished berries.  Drain well.  Mash with a potato masher until evenly crushed.  Most of the blueberries will remain whole but that’s OK, they will soften once cooked and add a nice chunky texture to the jam.

Wash jars and place them in boiling-water canner.  Fill the jars and canner with water to the top of the jars.  Cover and bring water to a simmer over medium heat, do not boil.  Prepare the two piece closures.  Wash lids and place in a small saucepan and cover with water.  Heat to just a simmer but do not boil.  Do not heat screw bands.

While jars are simmering, bring crushed berries, lime juice and sugar to a rolling boil in an 8-quart stainless steel sauce pan or enameled Dutch oven over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until sugar dissolves.  Continue cooking, stirring often,  for 7 minutes.  Remove from heat and let foam settle (about 1 minute).  Skim off and discard any foam.

Lift the canner jar rack and fix into place on the rim of the canner. Remove one jar at a time from canner and empty hot water back into the canner. Place jar on a cutting board and place a canning funnel in the jar.  Ladle hot jam into jar leaving 1/4 inch head space.  With a clean damp cloth or paper towel wipe jar rim to remove any food residue.  Using a magnetic utensil, lift hot lid from water, center it on the  jar and place screw band on jar.  Tighten screw band evenly and firmly just until resistance is met.  Then increase to finger tip tight.  Do not over tighten.  Return jar to canner rack.  Continue filling jars individually until all jars are filled, then lower rack into canner and ensure that all jars are covered by 1 inch of water.  Cover canner and bring water to a full boil over high heat.  Process for 5 minutes, starting timer only when water reaches a full boil.

Remove jars from water, and let stand, undisturbed, at room temperature 24 hours.  You will hear the seals pop rather quickly once the jars are removed from the water.  If any of the lids do not seal, refrigerate the jam and enjoy right away.  Properly sealed jars will keep in your cupboard for up to one year, but why wait? Share them with your family and friends.  They will be delighted to receive a precious jar of homemade jam.

***We write the date the jam was made on the bottom of the jar with a Sharpie pen.

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